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Document type
  • Journal Article
GE organism
  • Poplar
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  • other
Country
  • United States

Results

Efficacy
  • positive effect

Transgenic plants for phytoremediation: helping nature to clean up environmental pollution Review Article

Van Aken, Benoit
Trends in Biotechnology. 2008 May. 26(5):225-227

Link to full text (journal may charge for access)

PMID: 18353473 DOI: 10.1016/j.tibtech.2008.02.001 ISSN: 0167-7799

Abstract

Phytoremediation is the use of plants to clean up environmental pollution. However, detoxification of organic pollutants by plants is often slow, leading to the accumulation of toxic compounds that could be later released into the environment. A recent publication by Doty and colleagues describes the development of transgenic poplars (Populus) overexpressing a mammalian cytochrome P450, a family of enzymes commonly involved in the metabolism of toxic compounds. The engineered plants showed enhanced performance with regards to the metabolism of trichloroethylene and the removal of a range of other toxic volatile organic pollutants, including vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and benzene. This work suggests that transgenic plants might be able to contribute to the wider and safer application of phytoremediation.

Funding

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  • Not reported
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Cite this study

MLA

Van Aken, Benoit. "Transgenic plants for phytoremediation: helping nature to clean up environmental pollution." Trends in Biotechnology 26.5 (2008): 225-227. Web. 19 Sep. 2017.

APA

Van Aken, Benoit. (2008). Transgenic plants for phytoremediation: helping nature to clean up environmental pollution. Trends in Biotechnology, 26(5), 225-227. doi:10.1016/j.tibtech.2008.02.001

Please verify citations before use, citations are automatically generated based on information stored within the GENERA database and therefore may or may not be correct.